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Did Minimum Wage Increase in My State?

By Katharine K. Sangha

With the New Year, minimum wage increases have taken effect in nineteen states. Two of these states, Massachusetts and Washington, now require employers to pay $3.75 more per hour than the federal minimum wage of $7.25, which has remained static since 2009. Employers in the below-listed states should ensure that employees are paid in accordance with these new standards for pay periods beginning January 2017.

The following states have a new minimum wage, effective January 2017:

  • Alaska  -  $9.80 
  • Arizona  -  $10.00 
  • Arkansas  -  $8.50 
  • California*  -  $10.50 
  • Colorado  -  $9.30 
  • Connecticut  -  $10.10 
  • Florida  -  $8.10 
  • Hawaii  -  $9.25 
  • Maine  -  $9.00 
  • Massachusetts  -  $11.00
  • Michigan  -  $8.90 
  • Missouri  -  $7.70 
  • Montana  -  $8.15 
  • New Jersey  -  $8.44 
  • New York*  -  $9.70 
  • Ohio  -  $8.15 
  • South Dakota  -  $8.65 
  • Vermont  -  $10.00 
  • Washington  -  $11.00 

The minimum hourly wage a given California employer must pay depends upon the employer’s headcount. Employers with 25 employees or fewer must pay employees at least $10.00 per hour. Employers with 26 employees or more must pay employees at least $10.50 per hour. 

Similarly, New York has enacted a minimum wage law that takes into account both an employer’s size and where the employer is located. Employers in New York City with 10 employees or fewer must pay employees at least $10.50 per hour. Employers in New York City with 11 employees or more must pay employees at least $11.00 per hour. Employers in Nassau, Suffolk, and Westchester counties, no matter how large the workforce, must pay employees at least $10.00 per hour. Employers in the rest of New York state, no matter how large the workforce, must pay employees at least $9.70 per hour.
  
In addition to state minimum wage laws, employers must be aware of municipalities that require employers to pay a higher minimum wage than state or federal law. Employers concerned about their pay obligations should speak with able counsel to avoid any potential wage-related liability.